Respiration

Respiration: timeline of key events

Warburg was a physician and physiologist who won the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1931 for his discoveries relating to cellular respiration. This was based on some experiments he launched in the early 1920s to understand the process by which oxygen is consumed in the ells of living organisms. This led to his identification of the role of cytochromes, a group of haemoprotein cell components that with the aid of enzymes enable the transfer of energy within cells. Warburg was forbidden by the Nazi regime from receiving a second Nobel Prize in 1944 for uncovering nicotinamide, the mechanism and enzymes involved in fermentation, and his discovery of flavin (in yellow enzymes).1883-10-08T00:00:00+0000Heymans was a physiopharmacologist. By experimenting on dogs, he demonstrated how the body measures the content of oxygen in the blood and blood pressure and transmits this to the brain. In 1938 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering how respiration is regulated by pressure sensory organs associated with the cartoid artery and aortic arch. He went on to prove in 1950 that blood pressure is regulated by specialised nerve endings called pressoreceptors which are sensitive to the stretch of vessel walls. 1892-03-28T00:00:00+0000Heymans was a physiopharmacologist. By experimenting on dogs, he demonstrated how the body measures the content of oxygen in the blood and blood pressure and transmits this to the brain. In 1938 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for discovering how respiration is regulated by pressure sensory organs associated with the cartoid artery and aortic arch. He went on to prove in 1950 that blood pressure is regulated by specialised nerve endings called pressoreceptors which are sensitive to the stretch of vessel walls. 1968-07-18T00:00:00+0000Warburg was a German physician and physiologist who won the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1931 for his discoveries relating to cellular respiration. This was based on some experiments he launched in the early 1920s to understand the process by which oxygen is consumed in the ells of living organisms. This led to his identification of the role of cytochromes, a group of haemoprotein cell components that with the aid of enzymes enable the transfer of energy within cells. Warburg was forbidden by the Nazi regime from receiving a second Nobel Prize in 1944 for uncovering nicotinamide, the mechanism and enzymes involved in fermentation, and his discovery of flavin (in yellow enzymes). 1970-08-01T00:00:00+0000
Date Event People Places
8 Oct 1883Otto H Warburg born in Freiburg im Breisgau, GermanyWarburgKaiser Wilhelm Institute
28 Mar 1892Corneille J F Heymans born in Ghent, BelgiumHeymansGhent University
18 Jul 1968Corneille J F Heymans diedHeymansGhent University
1 Aug 1970Otto H Warburg diedWarburg 

1 Aug 1970

Otto H Warburg born in Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany

28 Mar 1892

Corneille J F Heymans born in Ghent, Belgium

18 Jul 1968

Corneille J F Heymans died

1 Aug 1970

Otto H Warburg died

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